Ratzon: Center for Healing and Resistance

The name Ratzon comes from Hebrew word for “yearning and possibility.” It is appropriate then that the center serves as a space to hold events related to the LGBTQ+ Jewish experience, a mutual aid organization, and a host for the national Queer Jewish Youth Group Shulayim L’Shalom (“From margins to peace”).

Hearts Together Tree of Life Exhibit and Community

This memorial is dedicated to the nine Jewish worshippers that lost their lives in the Pittsburgh shooting at the hands of an antisemitic white supremacist on October 27th, 2018 in Squirrel Hill. Following the

Rodef Shalom Biblical Garden

Built in the 1980s by Rabbi Walter Jacob and his wife, Irene, the garden brings biblical history to life through a colorful arrangement of flora, pools of running water, and plaques inscribed with bible verses. With unique attractions and educational programming every summer, the garden is not only a vital part of Jewish life in the city, but a center for interfaith collaboration and unity in Pittsburgh.

Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall and Museum

In the center of Oakland stands Soldiers and Sailors Museum and Memorial, a building much like a classical temple. But instead of a place of worship, it is a place to honor American veterans and those who lost their lives fighting for their nation.

Kehilat Sfarad Congregation

Kehilat Sfarad Congregation is the only Sephardic Jewish congregation in Pittsburgh. It began as a group of 10 men of Egyptian, Moroccan, Israeli, Greek, and Iranian heritage. Some of the congregants are also Mizrahi Jews, or Jews of Middle Eastern descent. As opposed to Ashkenazi Jews whose ancestors hail from Europe, Sephardic Jews’ ancestors were expelled from Spain and moved to places such as what once was the Ottoman Empire and countries in North Africa.

Irene Kaufmann Settlement Auditorium

Now known as the Elsie Hillman Auditorium, the Irene Kaufmann Settlement House Auditorium is the last existing building of the Irene Kaufmann Settlement House (IKS). The IKS was a massive hub for Pittsburgh immigrants from the late 1800s to the first half of the 1900s, and it played a particularly integral and impressive role in assisting Jewish immigrants at the time.

The Pauline Hanauer Rosenberg Residence

The Pauline Hanauer Rosenberg Home sits idly at 417 Lockhart Street in the North Side of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in what was originally known as Deutschtown. The home is most notably known for one of its most preeminent residents, Pauline Hanauer Rosenberg. While Mrs. Rosenberg was in residence, the home served as a conduit for many transformative social events and connections within the Jewish community.

The Church Brew Works

As its name suggests, the building that houses Lawrenceville’s Church Brew Works began life as a house of worship—St. John the Baptist Roman Catholic Church. Now, like many of the church buildings that left empty around Pittsburgh, St. John the Baptist has found new life after transformation, open seven days a week to any congregants who want to sit at a repurposed pew and sample one of the brewery’s offerings.

Pittsburgh International Airport Interfaith Reflection Room

Stepping into the Interfaith Reflection Room at the Pittsburgh International Airport is like leaving the busy airport behind entirely. The large and quiet space is located on the mezzanine level of the airside terminal, next to some bathrooms and a private lounge. On the inside of the room are a few dozen plastic chairs facing two pulpits and a removable wooden crucifix on the front wall. The room is clean and bright. One wall is painted red with a long window at the top and a few multicolored stained glass squares in the corner that let in lots of light.

Mary Schenley Memorial Fountain

Mary Schenley wasn’t a pagan, but she found plenty of other ways to shock the upper-class society into which she was born in the nineteenth century. Born Mary Elizabeth Croghan in 1826, she eloped with a British army captain three times her age when she was fifteen years old and divided the rest of her life between Pittsburgh and London. The Mary Schenley Memorial Fountain, also called “A Song to Nature,” was built near Schenley Plaza in her memory in 1918.